The Green Party’s Civic Duty: Join the Democratic Party

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The following editorial was produced by Horatio Eden, Leader of the Opposition in the Essian Parliassam and head of the Essian Democratic Party. The opinions hereafter stated are his own and not those of the Messenger organisation.

The Parliassam has now been filled following a democratic exercise by the populace of the Essian Commonwealth; as head of the minority party, the Democrats, I accept this result and the decision of the populace that the Green Party should be the governing majority in our legislature.

What I can’t accept is that nearly a month has passed since the election and the Heaminister has refused to give a date for the opening of the first session of the Parliassam since the election. When attempts were made by his Lordship to open the legislature in Heaminister Frisch’s place, the Heaminister rejected them, citing an interest in convoking them himself, which the Lord respected.

If the Heaminister is so interested in convening the Parliassam himself, why does he not do so?

In five days, it will have been a month into the second Frisch term without a single action taken, executive or legislative, by the new majority government, and while I am no doubt biased in this respect, I feel the only solution is for the Green Party to reject the inactivity of their party executive and join the Democrats.

I submit three reasons why:

  1. The Democratic Party is ready, given the authority to do so, to set a date for the first session of the legislature within a week of having achieved a majority of the legislature.
  2. The Democratic Party has four significant works of legislation drafted and ready for review by the Parliassam, creating, among other things, a coherent criminal justice system and a system of contract law, as well as condemning the imperialist agenda of the Shorewellese Empire in the Corian matter, something the Essian government could and should have done far earlier – without this bill, Esse risks being delegated to irrelevancy in international affairs, its legislative branch hamstrung.
  3. The Democratic Party and the Green Party have very few differences insofar as legislative agenda; administrative law has proven, micronationally, to be non-controversial in a partisan sense, and both parties seek a resolution to the Beiwing affair that strips the judicial branch of the ability to create new political subdivisions, possibly the most notable Essian issue of our time.

The Parliassam will not convene under Heaminister Frisch. If the Essian Greens truly wish to see an active Essian government, they will see it – as we do – as their civic duty to provide the active Democratic Party leadership with the legislative mandate required to commence the government of the Commonwealth.